TEREZÍN

“Creativity in the Face of Death: The Contemporary Resonance of Terezín,” a three-day symposium, will explore the enduring influence of music and art created by prisoners at Terezín (Theresienstadt), the “model ghetto” near Prague designed by the Nazis as a sham showcase to mask their murderous campaign against Europe’s Jews. The inmates, mostly Jews from Germany and Czechoslovakia and among them many notable artists, writers, composers, and musicians, acted out their parts for unsuspecting visitors even as, in the shadow of death, they raised the spirits of their fellow prisoners. Only 12 percent of the 140,000 Jews originally sent to Terezín survived. Virtually all of the members of the artistic community perished in the death camps or at Terezín itself.

Their heroic example has served as a haunting challenge for later artists to create what Kafka declared books must be—“an axe for the sea frozen inside us.” “Creativity in the Face of Death: The Contemporary Resonance of Terezín” will bring together world-class musicians, dancers, choreographers, photographers, and scholars whose work has been touched by the legacy of Terezín.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

October 3 – December 21

PHOTO EXHIBIT
Featuring works by Loli Kantor and Dennis Darling
Bass Concert Hall, Lobby | Open 11:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. | Monday – Friday

Loli Kantor is a fine art and documentary photographer based in Fort Worth, Texas. Born in Paris, France, and raised in Tel Aviv, Israel, Kantor has been documenting Jewish life in central and eastern Europe for nearly a decade. Her work has been exhibited widely in the United States and internationally and is included in museums and private collections such as the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Lviv National Museum, Ukraine; and Lishui Museum of Photography, China.

Dennis Darling teaches in the UT School of Journalism, where he heads the Photojournalism Area. Darling has an MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and has taught photography and design at UT since 1981. His documentary work has been widely published and exhibited nationally and internationally. For the past six years he has led UT’s Maymester Abroad in Prague.

Wednesday 3 October

FILM SCREENING/Q&AThe Last Butterfly
Moderated by Robert Abzug
10:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. | Carver Museum & Cultural Center, Boyd Vance Theatre, 1165 Angelina St.

Karel Kachyna and Ota Hofman adapted Michael Jacot’s novel for this drama of a mime artist in Nazi-occupied Paris who is forced to put on a show for Red Cross observers at Terezín. Co-sponsored by the City of Austin Senior Activity Centers and George Washington Carver Museum and Cultural Center.

Tuesday 9 October

DANIEL HOPE AND FRIENDS
Forbidden Music
8:00 p.m. | McCullough Theatre

Daniel Hope, violin
Jeffrey Kahane, piano
Benny Kim, violin
Eric Kim, cello
David Small, baritone

The Miró Quartet:
Daniel Ching, violin
William Fedkenheuer, violin
Jonathan Largess, viola
Joshua Gindele, cello

The concert will be followed by the photo exhibit opening in the lobby of Bass Concert Hall.

Wednesday 10 October

ARTIST PANEL
Creativity in the Face of Death
Daniel Hope | Jeffrey Kahane | Donald Byrd
Moderated by Robert Abzug and Rebecca Rossen
12:00 – 1:30 p.m. | Harry Ransom Center, Prothro Theater

FILM SCREENINGLast Dance
2:00 to 3:30 p.m. | Harry Ransom Center, Prothro Theater

Powerhouse creative forces unite and sparks fly in Mirra Bank’s award-winning Last Dance. Bank follows the dazzling Pilobolus Dance Theatre and legendary author-illustrator, Maurice Sendak, Where the Wild Things Are, as they collaborate on the dance-theater work that honors a haunting Holocaust legacy.

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LECTURE – Tatjana Lichtenstein
From Fortress to Ghetto: Terezín / Theresienstadt in History
4:00 – 5:30 pm | Garrison 1.102

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DANIEL HOPE AND FRIENDS
Music from Terezín
8:00 p.m. | McCullough Theatre

Daniel Hope, violin
Jeffrey Kahane, piano
Benny Kim, violin
Eric Kim, cello
David Small, baritone

The Miró Quartet:
Daniel Ching, violin
William Fedkenheuer, violin
Jonathan Largess, viola
Joshua Gindele, cello

The concert will be followed by a talkback with the artists in McCullough Theatre.

Thursday 11 October

DISCUSSION on Celeste Rapanti’s I Never Saw Another Butterfly
With students from Bastrop High School
2:00 – 3:30 p.m. | Harry Ransom Center, Prothro Theater

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LECTURE/DISCUSSIONVeronika Tuckerova and Robert Abzug
History and Memory: The Emergence of Terezín in Historical Artistic Consciousness: Czechoslovakia and America
4:00 – 5:30 p.m. | Garrison 1.102

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PRE-PERFORMANCE LECTURERebecca Rossen and Robert Abzug
7:00 pm | Bass Concert Hall, Lobby Level 4

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SPECTRUM DANCE THEATER
The Theater of Needless Talents
Donald Byrd, choreographer and director
8:00 p.m. | Texas Performing Arts’ Bass Concert Hall

Spectrum Dance Theater’s The Theater of Needless Talents, an evening-long work choreographed by Donald Byrd, pays homage to the Jewish artists who, though imprisoned in Nazi death camps, managed to create, perform, and bring hope to themselves and fellow inmates. The work is a series of powerful and eloquent sequences comprising modern dance, theatrical vignettes, cabaret, and commentary drawn from the words of artists and others of the time. These searing and evocative segments resonate with the horror and the absurdity of the situation in which these artists found themselves. The dance is set to the music of composer and death camp victim Erwin Schulhoff. The Theater of Needless Talents strives to make connections between the Holocaust and present-day sufferings brought on by prejudice, oppression, and persecution.

The performance will be followed by a talkback with the artists and Donald Byrd in Bass Concert Hall.

This presentation of Spectrum Dance Theater was made possible by the New England Foundation for the Arts’ National Dance Project, with lead funding from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation and additional funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

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Terezín is presented by Texas Performing Arts and The Schusterman Center for Jewish Studies